Sterling Performance Brought the Power for Upcoming Kilo Record Attempt

Many thanks to Speed on the Water for reporting on the upcoming Kilo Record attempt. Here is a little bit we wanted to share from two recent posts. Be sure to check out the LIVE online coverage tomorrow morning on speedonthewater.com!

Fountain Kilo Attempt with Sterling Performance Engines – Photo Credit: SpeedontheWater.com

Fountain Kilo Record Attempt A Go For Saturday
Written by Matt Trulio 

In just [a day], Reggie Fountain, III, and Jeff Harris will attempt to set a new V-bottom kilometer speed record in a 40-foot purpose-built canopied V-bottom powered by twin 1,900-hp turbocharged Sterling Performance Engines. Barring any issues discovered in testing this week, the record attempts should begin on Saturday, Feb. 24, at approximately 7 a.m. on the Pamlico River near the Fountain Powerboats facility in Washington, N.C.

Sanctioned by the American Power Boat Association with the Offshore Powerboat Association as the presenting club, the event is not open for public viewing from the Fountain facility. In fact, the measured-kilometer course on the river, which will be closed to traffic for almost three miles in each direction from the kilo run area, is not visible from the Fountain plant, according to Tara Galligan, the marketing manager for Fountain parent company Iconic Marine Group.

“There will be an online stream after the event,” she said.

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This story was originally posted on SpeedontheWater.com.

 

Quick Facts On The Fountain Kilo Boat And Engines
Written by Matt Trulio

Engine builder Mike D’Anniballe of Sterling Performance in Milford, Mich., arrived in Washington [yesterday] to assist with testing and upping the power output of his 557-cubic-inch engines when the time comes. While their peak operating speed is 7,500 rpm, the 1,900-hp turbocharged engines make their peak horsepower at 6,800 rpm and peak torque of 1,500 foot-pounds at 4,700 rpm. At the 1,500-hp output, the turbochargers run 11 pounds of boost. At 1,900 hp, the boost goes up to 18 pounds.

“The biggest changes in going from the original 1,700-hp Sterlings to the 1,900-hp versions happened in the valve train with a little more lift and a more-aggressive cam,” said D’Anniballe. “We also went with a different impeller and housing to improve the efficiency of the turbochargers.

“I just got here,” he added. “I talked to Billy Moore and all he said about yesterday was, ‘It was incredible. The boat walked on plane.’ And that was with a 41-inch-pitch prop and a very tall gear.”

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This story was originally posted on SpeedontheWater.com.

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